McDonald's- McRib- fast food- pink slime
McDonald’s aims to debunk pink slime, plastic, rot-fail myths
October 14, 2014  //  By:   //  Health & Science, US News  //  Comments are off

by Carol Thompson

If you’ve ever cleaned out the deep crevices of your vehicle and found a old French fry or piece of a hamburger bun that doesn’t even look a day old and wondered why, McDonald’s has the answer.

The fast food giant has taken to social media in an effort to debunk the myths surrounding food ingredients. The company’s “Our food, your questions” campaign invites consumers to ask anything they want about McDonald’s food items and get an answer.

A near two-minute video on the company’s website promotes the new publicity campaign. In the video, the company denies there’s any pink slime in it’s beef products. McDonald’s insists there is no pink slime in its burgers and that they are made with 100 percent beef.

“Why doesn’t your food rot?” is one of the questions posed to the company. The response, “Most likely, this is because the food has dehydrated before any visible deterioration could occur.”  Another asks, “Are your eggs real.” The company answered, “Oh, they’re real alright.”

There are no worms in McDonald’s burgers either, according to the company which responded to the question with “No. Gross! End of story.”

The company also answered the question of whether the McRib uses the same plastic that’s found in yoga mats. The answer is yes. The company said that a chemical called azodicarbonamide, or ADA, is baked into the McRib rolls to keep the texture consistent, however, the chemical can be used in different ways. McDonald’s compared it as the equivalent of using table salt and the salt used to de-ice sidewalks.

McDonald’s has reportedly hired Grant Imahara, former host of Mythbusters, to clean up its image. According to Forbes, “in a study conducted 3rd Quarter this year by Brand Keys, Millennials reported a 20 percent decrease in visits to fast food chains, 13 percent indicted fast food was “cheap” and “edible” but not much more than that.”

The campaign began yesterday. Consumers with questions are encouraged to visit McDonald’s Twitter and Facebook pages.

Image: Flickr/Roadside Pictures

About the Author :

Carol Thompson is a veteran investigative reporter residing in central New York. She spent 23 years with a local newspaper, The Valley News, before leaving for the Syracuse New Times, and now, VNN. Thompson has won dozens of first-place awards for investigative reporting and was the 2006 recipient of the Syracuse Press Club’s prestigious Selwyn Kershaw Professional Standards Award. Thompson’s reporting has resulted in the arrest of public officials and has prompted policy changes. She uncovered two money laundering schemes that traveled the globe and resulted in the indictments of several developers.

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