The arbitration tides are turning
July 3, 2015  //  By:   //  Arbitration, Consumer News  //  No Comment

by Carol Thompson

Three recent cases show that federal policy favoring arbitration is not absolute, according to Lexology.

The controversy over arbitration has been brewing since early spring when the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued a lengthy report outlining consumer dissatisfaction with the arbitration process—including its cost and unfairness.

Three federal appellate courts reaffirmed lower courts’ refusal to compel arbitration.

The controversy over arbitration has been brewing since early spring when the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued a lengthy report outlining consumer dissatisfaction with the arbitration process—including its cost and unfairness.

Three federal appellate courts reaffirmed lower courts’ refusal to compel arbitration.

In LoRoad, LLC v. Global Expedition Vehicles, LLC, __ F.3d __, 2015 WL 3449847 (8th Cir. June 1, 2015).  The plaintiff and defendant had exchanged multiple revisions of the contract, until finally the defendant sent a version that plaintiff appeared to accept by wiring a deposit on the funds due under the contract and faxing the contract back with the signature of an (unauthorized) principal and “minor handwriting notations and changes.”  Later, however, plaintiff asserted “unfinished business” and threatened to rescind the contract, and the defendant suggested revising the contract.  Applying UCC and Missouri law, the Eighth Circuit found the plaintiff never accepted the contract.  Furthermore, even though every version of the agreement contained the same arbitration provision, the Eighth Circuit found “there was an enforceable agreement to arbitrate if, and only if, [plaintiff] proved there was a final, enforceable [contract].”  (Plaintiff had filed suit to compel arbitration.)

In Lloyd v. J.P. Morgan Chase & Co., __ F.3d __, 2015 WL 3937978 (2d Cir. June 29, 2015), the issue was whether putative class and collective actions by former financial advisors could proceed in court.  The employment agreements call for arbitration of “any claim or controversy … required to be arbitrated by the FINRA Rules … no claims shall be arbitrated on a  … collective or class-wide basis.”  The current FINRA Rules prohibit arbitration of any class or collective claims.  The employer moved to compel arbitration and the district court denied the motion, finding that plaintiffs’ class and collective action claims fall outside the scope of the arbitration clause.  The Second Circuit affirmed.  It engaged in a grammatical analysis of the arbitration clause (rejecting the employer’s argument about the “rule of the last antecedent”) and found that the phrase “required to be arbitrated by the FINRA Rules” modifies “claim or controversy.”  Therefore, because the current FINRA Rules did not require arbitration of class or collective actions, the claims could proceed in federal court, Lexology reported.

In  Cox Enterprises, Inc. Settop Cable Television Box Antitrust Litig., ___ F.3d __, 2015 WL 3875726 (10th Cir. June 24, 2015), the defendant’s motion to compel arbitration was denied because the court found the defendant waived its right to compel.  The appellate court found that the defendant waived its right by waiting until two years into the litigation – after moving to dismiss the claim, engaging in “extensive pretrial discovery,” and opposing class certification.  In particular, the district court was offended that the defendant’s failure to inform the court of the agreement until after class certification had wasted significant court resources and suggested an attempt at “multiple bites at the apple” and to “play heads I win, tails you lose.”

 

 

About the Author :

Carol Thompson is a veteran investigative reporter residing in central New York. She spent 23 years with a local newspaper, The Valley News, before leaving for the Syracuse New Times, and now, VNN. Thompson has won dozens of first-place awards for investigative reporting and was the 2006 recipient of the Syracuse Press Club’s prestigious Selwyn Kershaw Professional Standards Award. Thompson’s reporting has resulted in the arrest of public officials and has prompted policy changes. She uncovered two money laundering schemes that traveled the globe and resulted in the indictments of several developers.