Watch woes for Apple- Connecticut AG questions health privacy
September 17, 2014  //  By:   //  Tech  //  No Comment

by Carol Thompson

George Jepsen, the attorney general for the state of Connecticut, has sent a letter to Apple raising privacy concerns in regard to health information over the newly introduced Apple Watch.

In a Sept. 12 letter to Apple CEO Tim Cook, Jepsen requested a meeting with company representatives to discuss his concerns about how personal consumer information collected through the Apple Watch will be stored and safeguarded.

“Based on published reports, Apple Watch will have the capacity to collect, store and use consumers’ health information. In light of these reports, I have questions about this technology and its potential impact on the privacy of Connecticut residents,” Jepsen wrote.

Recently, Apple unveiled a digital watch that will double as a fitness tracker and run a variety of apps. The company said the watches will be available next year.

The attorney general noted that Apple was clear in its public statement that the watch will “help people lead healthier lives.”

Jepsen proposed that when meeting with Apple the issue of how personal and health information will be stored on the Apple Watch be discussed, as well as how the information will be safeguarded and how it will monitor and enforce the applications’ guidelines on user health information.

The letter, Jepsen said, is an invitation for dialogue, not an accusation against Apple. He added that he applauded Apple’s use of technology to encourage and facilitate personal health.

Jepsen noted that it was the appropriate time to open dialogue as the watch has yet to be made available to the general public.

The Apple Watch is a smartwatch that will be available in early 2015. Prices will start from $349.

Image: Flickr

 

 

 

About the Author :

Carol Thompson is a veteran investigative reporter residing in central New York. She spent 23 years with a local newspaper, The Valley News, before leaving for the Syracuse New Times, and now, VNN. Thompson has won dozens of first-place awards for investigative reporting and was the 2006 recipient of the Syracuse Press Club’s prestigious Selwyn Kershaw Professional Standards Award. Thompson’s reporting has resulted in the arrest of public officials and has prompted policy changes. She uncovered two money laundering schemes that traveled the globe and resulted in the indictments of several developers.